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back to see where the tide really turned, right, and that was 1964, civil rights law being signed by lyndon johnson and he said, and this is to paraphrase him, i've lost the south for the generation, meaning the democrats have lost south for a generation, and if you really peel back what he's trying to say is that anyone who was against his idea of diversity is going to free the democratic party and go to the republican party, and since the signing of this law democrats have had a very difficult time penetrating that bloc of the south states, of the traditional southern states, and racial tension is part that have block. now if the republican party really wants to move forward in terms of having didversitdivers needs to acknowledge, not say that that's who we are, acknowledge that that part of the history is continuing to make up a small partial of the republican party. a cnn employee had shells thrown at her and called a monkey had. they said this kind of attitude is not tolerated here at the rnc, we would not continue to embrace those kinds of people. they ignored it, and i hope
, is it a civil rights issue? do you sense a sea change in the republican party on this issue? >> well, i think the senator's announcement made the topic timely, but in our state, i mean, the fs in the constitution years ago. they made a similar change in ohio. it didn't come up in my 2010 election or 2012. >> you said it's generational. >> i think it is. >> are younger conservatives more apt to see marriage equality as something that is, you know, what they believe, that is basic rather than as a disqualifying issue? >> i think there's no doubt about that. but i think that's all the more reason, when i talk about things, i talk about the economic and fiscal crises in our state and in our country, that's what people want to resonate about. they don't want to get focused on those issues. >> frank? >> well, i think the issue is sensitive, real -- a challenge in families and in society. you know, there is a sea change going on. i think federally and certainly at the state level over the course of the last 20 years 30 states still have a prohibition against sarnlme-sex marriages. and you can see ge
in the civil rights movement or the anti- vietnam war demonstrations or about black creators who have been so involved in american politics. is it all conservative that you object to? >> no, what i object to -- [applause] what i object to is someone seeking to use his faith to question the faith of another or to use that faith and seek the power of government to impose it on others. >> at that time, diane sawyer was there. you were there. it is interesting that those two men, especially mr. mondale, agreed that you and diane sawyer could be on the panel. >> yeah and jim was the other one from "the new york daily news." >> yeah. >> i was certainly surprised. >> i was a reporter for "the baltimore sun" and covered the national politics. i was also, by then, i had gotten more interested in politics, and i was writing a press column for "the american spectator" magazine. >> conservative? >> conservative. and i guess the mondale people didn't recognize that. i think my questions were very fair. you know, one of the things that is noticed particularly among conservative journalism, journalists. if
to vote. proponents say the law will reduce voter fraud but civil rights groups say it is an effort to discourage legal residents from voting as well. four other laws have similar voting requirements and 12 more could soon follow. robert barnes is the correspondent for the "washington post." how does this arizona law work and why do some folks say that it violates federal law? >> well, this is a part of the federal law called the motor voter law which makes it easier for people to register to vote. with part of this law, you can mail in your registration request and you sign that you swear that you were a citizen under oath. and send it in. what arizona wants to do is in those forms, they want you to also provide some sort of proof that you are a citizen. a driver's license number or if you don't have that, then a copy of a birth certificate or something like that. >> why are some folks saying it violates federal law? >> well, the federal law on registration says all you have to do is fill out this card. and it says that states must use this form. so the conflict is whether or not a
against civil rights, they were being peeled off to vote for george wallace, the symbol of proud segregation. also, different problem for the democrats. people hated the vietnam war. and the president at the time was a democrat, lyndon b. johnson. so if you were against the war, as most americans at that point were -- this is the gallop polling on the war -- the number of people who thought it was a mistake -- if you were against the war as increasingly everybody was, you were so the psyched to vote for lbj's successor. so the democrats were losing their appeal in the south because of racism, and they were losing the anti-war vote. the republican candidate tried to take advantage of that split, and was this handsome devil. nixon in 1968 was running against a democratic party that he knew was split. he was, in response, pledging to get rid of the draft. and he claimed to have a plan to end the war. he argued that if you wanted the war to end, you needed to elect him. you needed to vote the democrats out of office because clearly lbj and his party, the democrats and the democratic
of post civil rights era generation. to talk about that experience, related to the palestinians and appeal to young israelis, that's the broader message here. >> yes, i think we're a long way from cairo, you know. i think what president obama and his people and his staff understood that in israel, you have to touch the public opinion. and then the leaders especially been minimum n benjamin netanyahu will follow. this man walked back from lots of principles just to get the soldier back. netanyahu was very, very attuned to the public opinion. so i think they understood they have to grasp the young generation, the people of israel. i think president obama did that from the very first moment he stepped down in israel. you know he was off that plane, he took off his jacket, he was informal. he hugged every kid he saw on the way. he first he took netanyahu, he talked about you know his wife, his late brother. his kids. and today he took the israeli public. but you know, i'm not sure because i was listening to that speech and i was asking myself, was it the caring parent giving a pep talk to his
, would we have allowed mississippi in 1960 to determine the civil rights of african-americans? i think the answer is absolutely not. i don't want any state telling me yes or no. i want the federals telling them to say yes. >> thank you both. >>> next, the new green giant. dylan ratigan gives back to the community and america's bravest. stay with us. [ male announcer ] rocky had no idea why dawn was gone for so long... ...but he'd wait for her forever, for any reason, and wod always be there with the biggest welcome home. for a love this strong, dawn only feeds him iams. compared to other leading brands, it has 50% more animal protein. ...to help keep rocky's body as strong as a love that never fades... if he ever lets her leave again. iams. keep love strong. bring your own lettuce. byol. and we'll dress it up with grilled chicken. crunchy veggies. fruits, dressings and crispy noodles. new lean cuisine salad additions. just byol. find us in frozen. earning loads of points. we'll leave that there. you got a weather balloon, with points? yes i did. [ man ] points i could use for just abou
of the brave. they discuss their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia festival of the book. tonight at 8:00 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> up next on booktv physician and science writer talking about the influence of the pharmaceutical industry. he argues that pharmaceutical companies hide negative studies and use expensive lobbying to get what they want. the event from seattle's town hall lasts about ninety minutes. [applause] thank you. app fair dislow sure. i'm hoping it's aer in i did nerdy crowd -- [cheering and applause] you are my people. [laughter] there's no reader's health advice here. i'm not going tell you how to get the best out of the doctor. there are no idle conspiracy theories how drug companies are trying to kill us. it's a story about flaws in how we dwat gather evidence in medicine. i think the technical flaws in important technical process very well documented in the medical academic professional literature what i'm hope dog is share that more broadly with the public. in particular because there's several very
their personal experiences during the civil rights movement. live from the virginia test festival of the book tonight at k58 eastern. part of booktv this weekend on c-span2. >>> here's a look at books being published this week. and youngest siblings a hollywood agent in "brothers emanuel "a memoir of an american family. in the angry days roosevelt, lindberg, and america's fight over world war ii recounting the political battle between american isolationist and interventionist during world war ii. jeff chu articles editor for fast company magazine present the thoughts on religious and gay rights.
the civil rights movement and because of the history of america and because he said several crucial phrases, essentially said that israel will never go away. so he sort of laid out the honey, then he went and gave the vinegar line saying you have to actually now do a few things you don't like, and here they are. he did a good job from the israeli critics' perspective. >> the palestinians aren't happy, the disproportionate amount of time in israel and what he asked of the two leaders, made no public demand of netanyahu yet in israel he talked about the settlement issue. it is different than four years ago, on the arab street, including ra mal a, thought it would be different. now the israelis think we understand each other better here. >> one thing the president succeeded doing, strategically very important, john, the president set up a phone call between the prime minister of israel and the leader of turkey, the prime minister, and they both agreed turkey, a nate oh ally, israel a close ally, they were going to try to normalize the relationship. it is important for the region and the u.s. a
historic civil rights legislation the income tax cut in just six weeks after the assassination of president kennedy mix to 80 dead and threatened and praised and did what a hands-on leader does and his hands were huge and the stories about johnson grabbing people by the shoulder and just getting right in their grill to make them realize a one part and it was. how about my dad and the managing of the fall of the iron curtain as the soviet empire was collapsing there were significant dangers that there would be violence of epic proportions to be the the united states could have justifiably done a victory dance over the soviets, particularly for example when the berlin wall fell. i will never forget watching my dad on tv and critics, the pundits were saying he should go over there and celebrate with the german people. had my dad done with the people of this year and now wanted to do rather than being a leader would have created greater fall more abilities for gorbachev to create an orderly transfer without will blood shed. amazingly so. a dictatorship of epic proportions in the 20th century fe
-- is keeping the draft some of the civil-rights movement and people were briefly joining martin mr. king was assassinated april of 68 and just after i graduated kennedy was assassinated that had a huge impact on me. instead as the good quality of law in london if you could write fast and giveback accurately you did well but in a harvard they would change the goalpost and that was interesting because it encouraged sinking but most of all but struck me which was so different from the ireland i have left was young people making a difference favor deciding we could make a change and use things and we are going to bring on our own perspective so i came back to ireland in 1968 to practice and teach lot and as mine has been to be said i was in view was something he recognized as harvard humility. that led me the following year to question why it was those who were traditionally elected to the six universities scenes with elderly male professors, why was that? my friend said if you do want to go forward we will campaign with you. i was elected to the senate at the age of 25 that means i was prac
of the last civil rights fight of their generation. and so you're going to be seeing them together. ted olson will be the one arguing the case. he's argued 60 times, suzanne, before the court. he's won 44 of those times. so it will be interesting to watch. >> that is dpoing to be a fascinating case. gloria, tell us a little about you have a special coming up as well. >> we do. >> you've spent a lot of time with these guys. >> it's really a story of how this case all got started. you'll recall, suzanne, when president obama was first elected in 2008, you covered that race, he was elected but then proposition 8 also passed in california. and that outlawed the right for same sex couples to marry, took it away from them in that state. and so you have a story that really starts in hollywood with rob rhiner of all people deciding, oh, my god, this can't occur and he and his friends recruiting ted olson and ted olson recruiting david on this case and making it through the california courts. and now to the supreme court. >> yeah. it's a fascinating story. gloria, thank you so much. appreciate it as a
a small bit at a time. >> civil rights. >> sure. certainly entitlements come to mind as well. the fact is, there is a period a few days after new town. where the idea of bringing back the ban on assault weapons would not have seen totally crazy. three or four months later, it's pretty clear that it's not going to happen now and the politics have not changed. time passes on, people move on, and we in the media cover other things and we're back to where we were prenewtown in a lot of ways. >> i think things have changed in this separates, it's safe to talk about guns, the president could mention guns in the state of the union. if everybody plays their cards correctly, we could see an expanded background checks, that would be a big thing. things have changed. >> it's incremental change, ruth. >> in two weeks we'll find out, we'll have the debate. ruth marcus, jonathan martin, thank you. up next, senator richard blumenthal on the future of the gun control legislation in the senate. you are watching "andrea mitchell reports." a febreze experiment. to prove febreze can keep this car fresh, we l
, you're framing it as a new class of people. >> it's a straight up civil rights case. >> we will see. many thanks. howard dean, we appreciate it. kelly ann conway, as always. up next, financial markets frowned on today's last minute cyprus bank bailout or deposit or bail-in. i say it's the right policy. does it spell more trouble for the euro zone? has a similar depositor crisis already happened here in the usa? >>> cyprus clinched a last-minute deal to resolve the country's financial crisis. cnbc's international correspondent michelle caruso-cabrera joins us from cyprus with the very latest. good evening, michelle. >> reporter: cyprus finally secured a bailout agreement, but it's a tough one. in exchange for the money, they agreed to downsize their two biggest banks, which means thousands of job losses and a big hit to the economy. in terms of bailouts, big firsts here. bond holders and uninsured depositors will face losses. that hasn't happened before. now investors are on notice. they're going to have to be a lot more careful. the european taxpayer isn't going to protect you like
. it's tomas perez, assistant attorney general, who heads up civil rights division. the president is preparing for a visit to israel tomorrow. the first international trip of his second term and first of his presidency to jewish state. after visiting jerusalem he'll head to jordan. >>> this is the internal review detailing where the party went wrong in 2012 and how to reverse fortunes for the next election. >> we have to relate things to people's lives. we have to win the math war, which we do a good job of. but we have to learn how to win the heart war. in presidential elections what is plaguing our party. >> this comes after the first sort of votes of 2016 were cast this weekend with kentucky's paul winning cpac straw poll. we're joined live from washington with mark. i took a look at embargoed copy of this report coming out today. there are more than 200 recommendatio recommendations. >> it comes back to demographsidemographic demographics. what was very troubling for them as well as asian-americans as well. what prebus said on "face the nation" it's going to cost money. this i
of labor. currently in the civil rights division of the justice department. airbus and indonesia lie in their filing a $24 billion contract. the aircraft maker's biggest deal ever. the remains for 234 planes. the first deliveries scheduled for next year. panasonic reportedly exiting plasma tv production in health care businesses to become more cost-efficient. the building in tokyo for 60 billion yen. mastercard is defying a european debt crisis reporting an increase in credit and debit card usage. the value of transactions profit by mastercard climbed in europe last year. blackberry co says he expects 100,000 applications will be available when that blood perry makes his debut on friday. originally estimated 70,000 for the january blackberry event, and that is today's speed read. david: colder weather chilled consumers' appetite for spring merchandise. retailers struggle to lure shoppers back into the stores. sandra: we have someone who says spring fashion trends are gaining momentum, and she is predicting some of the season's biggest winners. joining us right now, gabriela, senior v
's an astounding thing. never in the history of any civil rights movement have we come so far so fast. and, i would say, even if we achieve full marriage equality and all of the other equal status of citizenship in this country, there would be work to be done. let's remember that when we got the jim crow laws off of the books in the signatures for african-americans, it didn't mean the end of racism. and there will still be anti-gay feeling and sentiment in the country that will need to be worked on. but getting the laws in order, that is an important step forward. >> these are all signs of just about every sector of the economy, young people, older people? >> that's right. >> businesses, you know academics, whatever action recognizing that this is an issue whose time has come. right? >> that's right. we've got, i think it's 81% of young people. >> 81%. >> favors same-sex marriage. you know, it's interesting, too, if the republican party is interested in appealing to them young people do not want to be associated with any group, whether it be a religious group
general for the civil rights division right now. he spent a lot of time in his career focusing on consumer rights and protection as well. if he is confirmed, the process that takes place after the official no announcement he will be only latino in the president's cabinet. they need to get americans back to work as labor secretary and what kind of role considering his background mr. perez might play in immigration reform and what type of employment policies could be put in place if there is some overarching immigration reform. we'll keep you posted on the announcement. as we hear more we'll bring that to you. jon: it was ten years ago that operation iraqi freedom launched. our own rick leventhal was embedded with the troops who fired the first historic shots. he will be here with a former commander of that battalion to reflect on the decade past. >>> were we all wrong about the wright brothers? why an aviation historian says they were not the first men to fly. who was? we'll talk to him next. hey, our salads. [ bop ] [ bop ] [ bop ] you can do that all you want, i don't like v8 juice. [ mal
to prosecutors. including the right to a fair and impartial trial. second, open the civil courts to military victims. civilian victims including dod employees, have one critical avenue that is currently unavailable to uniforms personnel and access to civil court. to this day, u.s. supreme court and the federal court below it continued to maintain that service members are barred from negligence or intentional discrimination against the military. depriving it for violations of their rights. congress must ensure that men and women in uniform can access the remedies available for all other individuals under the civil rights act. those who report incidents of absence, the absence of these remedies is especially shameful. today we are looking at an institution that desperately needs to be shown the steps forward. senators do not need to begin survivors. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. >> thank you for having me here. i have deep gratitude towards those who have worked tirelessly for our voices to be heard and those listening with compassionate and open hearts to make positive ch
and there was a time civil-rights, universal rights was the providence of federal government and local government got in the way as we all know in the 60s federal troops escorted african-americans into state and local universities in the south because mayors of places like little rock were a big part of the problem but nowadays that has changed in fundamental ways and i know longer see the central government as a friend of progress toward justice and for real opponent of big money. i see cities as better able to do that and it seems to me big money thinks big government is really the place it wants to operate. the reason big money isn't on the side of the tea party ultimately is they don't need to make big government smaller. they can buy it and own it and put it to their own uses and that is harder to do nowadays in the city's. a quick word. mayor bloomberg, a lot of mayors about whom we can argue, talked about some of the things we have problems, i had problems with bloomberg's change of the city constitution taking a third term and had problems with the weight he brought people into the school sys
it comes to human rights, civil rights, and equality, i don't believe we should have the left versus right. these are moral issues. these are issues that go to the heart of what human beings, who we are and what we should be about not toward the partisan politics but like everything else it's going to get played out in a partisan atmosphere but i would hope we respect the individual people who through no fault of their own just are trying to live their lives and not be tortured or be subjected to these type of conversion therapies. >> donna and ari flish, thanks very much. just ahead, did the u.s. secret service accidently fire a weapon near iran's president when he was in new york? and why would iran keep quiet about something like that? stand by. if youthen this willbrids arbe a nice surprise. meet the 5-passenger ford c-max hybrid. c-max come. c-max go. c-max give a ride to everyone it knows. c max has more passenger volume than competitor prius v and we haven't even mentioned... c-max also gets better mpg. say hi to the super fuel efficient ford c-max hybrid. [ babies crying ] surprise
he is saying is in america we don't do separate but equal. that's what the civil rights movement was about. go ahead. >> this is what i would say in response to that. when you turn gay marriage into anyone that is against it, as now you're somehow the equivalent of the civil rights movement and/or being like a racist, i think that is -- >> people didn't agree with interracial marriage. people didn't think black people should vote. people didn't think women should vote. does that make it right? should you respect that viewpoint? >> don, don, don, do you honestly believe -- let me answer this question. don, do you honestly believe i don't like you as a person because you happen to have a different lifestyle than i do? >> i never even -- it never even crossed my mind. >> that's my point, though. that's my point. that is exactly -- >> you don't want him to have the same protections under the law. >> no, i don't. i want him to have civil unions -- >> hang on. hold on. go ahead. >> i have one -- can't you personally be against gay marriage and just personally, but not, you know, be aga
engage, a large part of the population wouldn't engage with civil rights. then they said we have to find a way to do this. there's no reason why immigration reform and rand paul says hispanics are natural republicans which they used to say that about black people too. lost of people in america have faith in family and are not republicans. republicans should be natural to immigration reform. many depends on what kind of immigration reform. they could favor immigration reform that brings in large number of people driving down the wage rate who don't become citizens for an awfully long time and stop the hugest big government project i can think of which is building a useless wall between america and mexico. there's nothing conservative actually about the immigration, the nature of the immigration conversation. >> congressman i want you to respond to that. i want to talk about the devil in the details. where we are in the house and counter pose to where we are on guns right after we take a break. u can't go wrong loving i. vo: from the classic lines u can't go wrong loving i. to the elegant
told him in private, he favored gay rights and went as far as saying he didn't oppose gay civil unions. >> translator: he told me that he understand that homosexual people should have their rights protected in society. he also said he believed that argentina was not ready for a gay marriage law, but said he would favor a law granting civil unions. >> reporter: he said the meeting happened after he sent this letter on behalf of gay catholics supporting the same-sex marriage bill. "the new york times" reported wednesday at a private meeting of bishops, also in 2010, cardinal bergoglio advocated that the church support civil unions for gay couples. the roman catholic church could neither confirm nor deny the report at this point. while pope francis may have expressed such view while he was a cardinal, he should be given time to develop policy position as pontiff. >> rafael romo, cnn atlanta. >> let's bring in cnn contributor, father edward beck. you heard what he said in that piece. it looks as though in bun oss aries maya buenos aries there was a softer position. how will this indicate h
says he thinks his side will win and it won't be close since he says, marriage is a civil right. >> we are not asking for a new constitutional right. the constitutional right to marry is well established. in fact, the supreme court has ruled you can't take away the right to marry, even from imprisoned felons who can't have procreation because they can't get together. but you can't take it away because it's so important, it's a fundamental right of liberty. >> there could be fireworks. there won't be cameras present, but we will get same-day audios to hear how everything goes down. >> it's always interesting. because we get the transcripts fwowrks hear the inflection and the voice, always interesting, so, we will have it. >> yes, we will. >> in the next hour, we will have a fair and balanced debate with two key players in the same cases. the head of the national organization for marriage and the national campaign director for the freedom to marry. where do you stand on the two same-sex marriage cases? tweet us your answers. we will read your responses, later on in this show. they came t
convicted sunday and will serve at least one year in a juvenile prison. >>> and a major civil rights trial starts in new york. at issue is, whether the stop and frisk law unfairly target minorities? officers are allowed to stop, question, and sometimes frisk people on the street. city officials say it's helped dramatically reduce gun violence. >>> and a quiet indiana street in is shambles this morning after a private jet came crashing down. the corporate jet hit two homes in south bend, indiana, before becoming lodged in a third home. the pilot had reported electrical problems. >>> hundreds of people evacuated in eastern tennessee this morning after a wildfire erupts and destroys dozens of homes in great smoky mountains national park. helicopters are being brought in to douse the flames. >>> and a health scare for old school rapper tone loc. he clapsed on stage while performing in iowa. you haven't heard that name in awhile, have you? he reportedly has a history of seizures. the 47-year-old is best known for his '80s hit, everybody -- funky cold medina. >>> and finally, a pro football star
will be there and warren beatty, bay area scientist gregory baitsman civil rights activist deloweros. >>> twitter has been granted a new patent for twitter. the u.s. patent says it is unique because it's independent of devices. that could cause legal confusion for anyone providing similar services but twitter has already said it will only use the patent defensively. so far there's no reaction from other companies like facebook. fans of hostest, twinkies and ding dogs could see the treats back on the shelves this summer. two investment firms are paying $2.5 million for the brand name, recipes and five factories. it's up to the new owners to decide if they will hire bark the former hostess workers. >>> some of the biggest grocery store chains will encourage their customers to eat more fish. they will announce they will not sell a certain type of salmon engineered by a biotechnology company. they are doing this as the fda gets ready to approve the sale of that modified salmon. >>> police say a bay area teenager got burned playing with fire. how his injury is tied to a truck case. the businesses that were tar
for liberty and human dignity. a tale that was carried from slavery through the civil rights movement into today. for generations, this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution, while holding on to the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me, personally, growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots, the story spoke to a yearning within every human being for a home. of course, even as we draw strength from the story of god's will and his gift of freedom, expressed on passover, we also know that here on earth, we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect world. that means accepting our measure of sacrifice and struggle, just like previous generations. it mean us working, through generation after generation on behalf of that ideal of freedom. as dr. martin luther king said on the day before he was killed, i may not get there with you, but i want you to know that we as a people will get to the promised land. so just as joshua carried on after moses, the work goes on for all of you, the joshua generation. for justice and dignity, for opportu
. >> congressman john lewis and olympic gold medalist share their experiences during the civil right movement live, saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv on c-span 2. continues. journal" host: white house correspondent, thank you for being here. gun control. we saw a couple of things happen in the senate this week area leader reid, the head of the democrats in the senate is coming out now with a proposal, a gun bill. guest: his abilities going to of -- include the pillar his efforts, which is universal background checks. currently, it is against the law to purchase a gun if you are a criminal or have a dangerous record but not all require background checks. democrats are trying to put forward a bill that requires universal background checks. that has been the top priority for president obama. this bill will not include the assault weapons ban, which would ban certain types of high- capacity assault rifles and other weapons. there was not enough support in the senate to feel like that was possible to include and be able to pass the floor in the senate. it is a bit of a blow to the president ag
the civil rights movement live saturday at 8 p.m. eastern, part of booktv this weekend on c-span 2. difference striking between what is happening today and 100 years ago is the columnist of the parade. 100 years ago, the parade was not a parade, so much as a riot. the police refuse to protect the marchers. as they progressed, the crowds got larger and larger. they were very unruly. they had been drinking. they started to throw things at the women. they shouted and told them to go home. not just that, streetcars continued to him see people into the packed crowd the crowd got larger and larger and more aggressive. the women could not go forward. the police were not involved. the secretary of defense called out the calvary to push back the unruly crowd so that the women could continue their peaceful exercise of their first amendment rights. today, this is a wonderful peaceful assembly and as a liberation of how far have come in 100 years. >> this weekend, a look at the centennial celebration of the women's suffrage parade that took place on pittsylvania avenue in march, 1913 sunday at
fraud or fraud on wall street or public corruption or civil rights abuse. we need to make certain we are focused on the greatest revenue -- on the greatest american public. that really is in hansard are supporters of the -- in the hands of the prosecutors at the department of justice. >> what we are going to do is we are going to introduce the bill after -- and i am going to ask to your comments -- after the recess. it will be the bipartisan two of us. to set up a national commission made up of mainly prison experts, particularly in the states, many of them very conservative states. they have had to respond to the prison crowding more from an economic issue than any other. it will be bipartisan. ofare looking for a chairman stature who can come and take a year to report. i think our present system is dysfunctional and i sense there are very few people working the prisons. industry has been decimated because of congress. we tried to get prisons to adopt programs to allow them to make products that are no longer made in the united states. there are only two baseball cap manufacturers i
civil rights legislation in 1964 was 101 years. it didn't happen overnight, and so i think it's going take a while. but, as has been said, "a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step." i see the steps are beginning. >> god is mentioned a lot in your book. >> i think we've made a real mistake here in not realizing-- we spoke of history a moment ago-- that great men and women of our past, creative people, political people, all had a familiarity with scripture, with the ten commandments, the sermon on the mount, the golden rule, the way life works. now i'm not calling upon everybody to embrace my church or my beliefs, but i am saying that there are certain truths. ted koppel said some years ago in a remarkable speech at duke university on the ten commandments, "the truth is not a polite tap on the shoulder, it's a howling reproach." and he also said we've actually convinced ourselves that slogans will save us: "shoot up if you must, but use a clean needle." "enjoy sex whenever and with whomever you wish, but wear a condom." and then he said no, the answer is no; not no beca
young voters see these meters as some of the civil rights issues of our time. >> that is certainly true but this report didn't provide a clear direction for the republican party nor a clear analysis of what specifically went wrong. there was not a clear agenda to revitalize the economy and economic growth and fix an economy that is wobbly. the only real difference that the, at cpac was pat caddell who spoke truth to power about what would be in the report and what the republicans are doing. >> let me say something about what pat said because he will not toot his own horn but he was the only speaker whose speech has not been posted online by the guys that run cpac. >> i watched it online today. >> it has gone viral. >> that is the not the official version and the reason is what pat said a week ago friday. >> what was the message? >> the problem with the autopsy, which, by the way, is...this was what the jerusalem post said in a scandal newsreel, all are guilty but none are responsible. we have no message. meanwhile there was no explanation of the strategic failures, the real tactical fai
gregory baitsman civil rights activist deloweros. >>> twitter has been granted a new patent for twitter. the u.s. patent says it is unique because it's independent of devices. that could cause legal confusion for anyone providing similar services but twitter has already said it will only use the patent defensively. so far there's no reaction from other companies like facebook. fans of hostest, twinkies and ding dogs could see the treats back on the shelves this summer. two investment firms are paying $2.5 million for the brand name, recipes and five factories. it's up to the new owners to decide if they will hire bark the former hostess workers. >>> some of the biggest grocery store chains will encourage their customers to eat more fish. they will announce they will not sell a certain type of salmon engineered by a biotechnology company. they are doing this as the fda gets ready to approve the sale of that modified salmon. >>> police say a bay area teenager got burned playing with fire. how his injury is tied to a truck case. the busines
predicting that promise for everybody because of his life. as a civil rights attorney rightsan aide senator ted kennedy, a member of montgomery county's county council, he has helped level playing field where working families can get ahead. this is not chosen -- this is not the first time he was chosen to be a labor secretary. we have governor martin o'malley, and martin appointed, as the secretary of maryland's labor department, where heat implemented the first living wage law. le, he has open pathways for everyone willing to contribute, including people with disabilities withlbgt americans, and immigrants. while he has tackled plenty of tough issues, tom has spent a career as a consensus builder. he has worked with federal, state, and local government levels, and he understands our economy works best when the middle class and those working to get into the middle class have security they need on the job, a democratic voice in the workplace, everybody playing by the same set of word -- rules strict he will make an outstanding secretary of labor, and there are plenty of work to do. we will h
. this is not democracy. this is not freedom. >> right. >> what is it? >> what it is is first of all we set this thing up to where we supported the shiites and the sunnis are now -- there is going to be a version of a civil war. right now, as we speak here live on cnn there is an alternate reality on another network. they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> yes. i don't really want to, you know, disparage. >> let me read this tweet from donald rumsfeld. the iraqis deserve our respect and appreciation. >> he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney are walking the streets. the way they are trying to revise history saying it was a mistake or we were given bad information. say nobody sent me an e-mail or a tweet that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement they havethey are holding them there. i tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find no kids many n the basement? of course, you would think i would want to go after goldman sachs as bush wanted to go after saddam.
that they don't think is right. >> but the difference there is that the civil union and marriage are not exactly the same thing. and they're not exactly the same thing in a couple of different ways, important ways. one way is in medical coverage. >> but that -- you're talking about a definition. and what i'm saying is that i think the institution of marriage is a religious institution. but you can have the unions that has the same -- that affords the same people as a male/female marriage the same rights and the same protections under the law. >> you can get married by a justice of the peace or captain of a ship. can those unions be called civil marriage. >> we disagree on this. >> i think that it's important to recognize that when you talk about marriage, it is a religious institution and that people can still have the same rights and privileges, but you wouldn't want to force the church to perform those ceremonies and recognize it as a marriage. >> we have to go to commercial break, but this is a challenge. i think this is the big tent issue. but still ahead, new movie takes an unprecedented lo
it in an expedited way subject to rule, protections for privacy, civil rights and civil liberties that people the right to expect? we are making progress on all those fronts in addition to what cathy has said. >> i know my time is over expired so thank you, mr. chairman spent thank you very much. thanks for being here again. senator baldwin, welcome. great to see. please proceed spent i also want to thank the chairman and ranking member for holding this up and down review of the department of homeland security. clearly what was accomplished back in 2003 was no easy task, and i certainly recognize the incredible progress made in the 10 years since the departments creation. but since we're here today i want to focus in on a couple of the areas in which the department can improve or have been pointed out. fortunately, for me, senator ayotte's last question was the first question i was going to ask about in terms of the recommendations in the gao high-risk report on implementing sharing across agency so if you like you tackle that. but i also want to look at another area. mr. dodaro, and your tes
. and equally as important, a level playing field. we will ensure regard for civil liberties and civil rights. today, we look to our prime minister of forming his parliamentary government in the next few weeks. based on his consultations with parliament's come up which is an extension of the same constitutional process that esulted in his nomination. i am very proud of this process. what we are seeing is the third way in the middle east. we now enjoy the benefits of the arab summer for us all. we have to roll up our sleeves. it will be a very bumpy and difficult road. but i look forward to the future. again, mr. president, thank you to jordan. >> thank you very much. it is great to be back in ordan. i am glad to speak with my friend king abdullah. thank you to the people of ordan for their extreme warmth nd hospitality that i remember well from my first visit as a senator. that thing i mainly remember when i came here was his majesty personally drove me to the airport. i will not tell you how fast he was going, but secret service could not keep up. nevertheless, we are very much appreciative
and the sewnries -- now there's going to be a version of a civil war. right now as we speak here live on cnn, there's an alternate reality taking place on another network, and they are over there today saying how great it is. iraq's free. >> you mean fox. >> i don't really want to disparage them by name. >> donald rumsfeld, ten years ago, became long difficult work, all who played a role in history deserve our respect and appreciation. >> well, he's a war criminal as far as i'm concerned. i don't understand why he, bush, cheney, wolfowitz are still walking the street. the way they are trying to revise history now is by saying, well, it was a mistake or we were given bad information. you know, let's say somebody sent a tweet to us right now or sent me an e-mail that said goldman sachs downtown right now in their basement, they have kidnapped children, and they are holding them there, and i then tell the police this. what will happen to me when they go down to goldman sachs and find out that there's actually no kids kidnapped in the basement of goldman sachs, and, of course, you would think i would w
. great to have you here. >> welcome. uma: how do you successful will the civil rights groups will be when they take aim at what governor brewer has done? >> i think they're going to be successful. i think the federal law is what controls here, but i understand where the governor's coming from. her state is the one that suffers the most apparently by people coming here illegally. she needs to stand up. she needs to make a statement. she needs to say, we're not going to tolerate this, even if she will wind up losing in the federal court system. even if the federal judges say, no, no, this is federal issue. this isn't a state issue. there are certain issues, governor, you're in charge of but there are other issues where the president is in charge. uma: why isn't this seen as state issue particularly the time it will affect the citizens of that state? >> there is something called the supremacy clause. this is recalcitrant act by jan brewer. she is saying i will ignore president obama's executive order because i don't think it is federally authorized. yet, the state policy itself is up consist
, but marriage is not a religious her right. it is a civil right that is provided by the government. a church does not cover right to marry someone, except that it is given the right by the government. the government issues marriage license. the government decides who gets married and who does not. in 1967 there was a supreme court case, loving nurses virginia and blacks could not marry whites. they challenged that. the supreme court ruled 9-0. they have rolled 14 times about the fundamental rights of marriage. from a legal standpoint, there is no argument. you can make a moral standpoint if you want, but from a legal standpoint, there is no argument we feel confident. how broadly the supreme court will roll, that we do not know. >> go to c-span.org to see the rest of that discussion. live in half an hour we will have more on this issue. we will bring you a preview of the same-6 marriage cases coming before the high court tomorrow. legal experts -- legal experts will examine the case. that will be live here on c-span starting at 4:00 eastern. president obama today called on congress to begin
there going, white guy, black guy, i'm from memphis, i can talk civil rights. >> wait a minute. >> if we're on the cover of a magazine, i think that may create other questions. >> the rapture? >> yes. >> go ahead, you were saying? >> the bottom line is, i would love to see a situation where all women, you know, it was about the content of the magazine, and the character of women, so beautiful, no matter what color we are. we have so much in common. i don't care what color we are. and women are women. and together we can change the world. >> okay. >> i don't think it will hurt though. >> to this panel, that's it. can't we just all get along? i got to get out of here. thank you very much. >> we love you, don. >> i love you guys too. thank you. thank you. ben, i'll take you up on that. >>> coming up, you know dr. oz, he gives health advice to millions of americans. now one tip he gave landed him in some legal hot water. why one viewer is suing the popular tv doctor coming up. i don't make any decisions about who to hire without going to angie's list first. you'll find reviews on home repair
partnership regime and how foreign is equivalent to civil regimes elsewhere. it is in all the rights to domestic partners. it does not give the name. we said earlier that it cannot call themselves married. they can call themselves whenever they want. >> not if they apply for a passport. >> of their married the cannot do that. >> it is a federal crime. merit on a federaler o form? -- married on a federal form? sides agree both that the word marriage matters. the gays and lesbians as a degradation of some sort of recognition. those of us supporting to a traditional marriage see the word marriage draws on its that is tiedole to procreation and child rearing. we want men and women to understand that marriage is the ideal context in which to raise children, and in a sense to read the fine marriage in a way that eliminates the essential components. >> you have a bunch of people out there raising children right now cannot get married. if you think marriage is an important thing to happen your parents, if you think they would benefit from having unmarried parents. hawthorne and they have all
. what would you tell an independent minded gay man who believes the right to marry is a civil right? what would you tell him about why he should vote republican? >> i would tell him, look. we might not agree on every single issue but, for the most part, if you look at where we are at in our economy and look at where we are with educational choice and our military positions and positions on a strong defense in our party for the most part, we agree on almost everyone and doesn't make someone a bad republican. it means we are good republicans and disagree on one or two things. my god. i don't agree with my wife on 100% of the issues but it doesn't mean we don't have a great marriage. i don't see how that is not -- that's not a reasonable position for people to take. i think it's entirely consistent. i think it's a human position to take and i think it's a decent position to take. >> mr. chairman, quickly. this is rich lawrie's column and he was writing this for politico. he said so much depends on the substance. no rebranding is going to make a difference if republican policy is not re
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